Daily Top 5 Global HR News – 17 August 2017

Daily Top 5 Global HR News – 17 August 2017

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We bring together from ICube Research and published news, a summary of 5 items that are contemporary.

1. Wellness programs involving employee spouses more likely to see engagement

Dive Brief:

  • A study on the effect of spouses on employees’ wellness found that 28% of workers were more likely to participate in life-coaching programs if their spouses also took part, Benefits Pro reports. The HERO Health and Well-being Best Practices Scorecard in Collaboration with Mercer found that only 14% of employees participated in wellness programs when their spouse didn’t.
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    • The HERO study concludes that employees are more willing to take part in wellness programs when their partner also is involved. Benefits Pro says that employees’ partners have a powerful role in keeping them healthy and that employers can leverage that power by finding ways to include partners in wellness activities.
    • The study also found that although spouses make up just one-fifth of all people covered by an employer-sponsored plan, they generate one-third of healthcare costs. Benefits Pro says that employers can reduce healthcare costs by improving the health of employees’ spouses.

    Dive Insight:

    • Support from family and friends is key to most people’s physical and emotional well-being, which the HERO study underscores. If employees are more likely to participate in wellness activities with their partners, offering programs that encourage couples’ involvement could be well worth the upfront costs.
    • Employers with a family-oriented culture — or those looking to create one — will likely have a wellness program with a family focus. When Plantation, FL, officials wanted to offer a wellness program for their employees, they preferred a program that reflected the city’s family-oriented culture because they found a correlation between the culture and lower healthcare costs. They opted for an onsite clinic program that also included spouses — and reached a near 100% engagement rate from both.
    • Employers that are developing a wellness program, or expanding one they already have, can include activities that accommodate spouses for possibly healthier employees and greater ROI.

    http://www.hrdive.com/news/wellness-programs-involving-employee-spouses-more-likely-to-see-engagement/449127/

2. The HR function in a world of bits and bytes

ver the last decade, the human resources function has undergone a remarkable change, moving from a tactical to a strategic domain. Factors contributing to this shift in focus are: a hyper-competitive marketplace, transformation in organisational design and evolution of a new workforce. All of these are riding on the back of a digital revolution.

So, this question has to be asked: How should HR leaders shape the new digital world of work? Consider this: Technology in HR is currently a USD 54 billion industry. In India, “digitalisation” of HR is at a nascent stage and it contributes USD 600-700 million to this global industry.

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    Though India may be a late starter, there are signs that it will soon begin to take huge strides in this area.

    According to a 2017 India Human Capital Trends survey report by Deloitte, 96 percent of companies believe they need to redesign their organisations to succeed in the digital age and look for strategic intelligence and leadership from human resources professionals to become a digitally-inclusive and people-centric organisation.

    While seeking to create such organisations, the following elements have to be factored in.

    Talent-related decisions

    Talent management has to be become more strategic. Tactical functions such as on-boarding, pay-rolling and employee data management have to be assigned to smart technological solutions. Doing so will ensure enough time and mind space for HR leaders to work closely with other business units and help them make talent and business decisions using real-time data. It is high time we get this right: Technology will act as a valuable tool, but the ultimate decision makers will be people.

    Brand-building efforts

    Thanks to social media, now everyone knows what it is like to work in a particular company. This has led to a trend of employer branding. HR leaders have to empower employees with a strong employer brand, great company narrative and an inspiring work environment. Besides that, with the aid of technology which has opened up an overwhelming world of data, HR leaders have to formulate workforce strategies backed by data and insights. Therefore, today’s HR leader is truly a brand builder, an analyst, a communicator, a motivator and a collaborator.

    Digital skill gaps

    Several of the credible research studies indicate that employees are aware of digital disruption and the speed with which it is going to transform work. Today’s workforce, consisting largely of millennials, does not fear change and is well aware of the benefits digital technology brings to their work, organisation and life at large. They are actively seeking digital skills.

    Therefore, waste no time and channelise this positivity by formulating a clear digital vision that broadly begins by first accessing the digital skill gaps existing and then identifying the right channel of digital training — in-house or through a third-party specialist.

    A measurement metric aimed at understanding how well this has been delivered to your employees has to be developed.

    The journey from traditional to digital is not as complex as we imagine it to be. It does not demand a 360-degree transformation. It only requires us to take a ‘digital leap of faith’ and let progressive technological solutions show us a more clear, unbiased and true picture of a situation. What makes this journey a super interesting one is how compassionately HR leaders will spread this ‘digital’ wisdom to the workforce.

    http://www.thehindu.com/education/careers/the-hr-function-in-a-world-of-bits-and-bytes/article19474903.ece

3. Driving Retention Using Talent Data and Analytics

Even with the advancements in talent management, organizations often grapple with decoding the basics, for example, employee attrition. Employee attrition is a reality that employers must face head-on, and one that is very closely linked to the employee engagement levels. In fact, many employees leave within the first few years, turning out to be a cost-intensive investment for various reasons. HR professionals are left wondering what went wrong with the employee experience. Little do they realize that they have the answer right before them, in the form of the humongous wealth of data collected from the very people who have left. So the question is, where should HR dig into, to decode the attrition challenge? Communication data, exit interviews, email data, system access data, internal social media data, chat data—every data source can provide great insights into what is going on in the mind of the employee. It can give HR the lead when the first seeds of leaving crop up in the employee’s mind. Of course, employee privacy norms must be upheld when carrying out such an investigation of data points.

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    The problem with talent analytics is that HR is using it mainly for retrospection, i.e. for acting on the results. Getting true value from the data mentioned above needs HR to go beyond the obvious, i.e. proactive measures to predict the ‘flight risk’. Only when they turn from reactive to proactive can they solve the organizational challenge. For this, one must first classify the reason for dissatisfaction and input it into the analytics tools for further insight and action mapping. Here is a closer look at some of the common indicators of a possible exit case and the associated data sources that one should track:

    1. Changes in attendance patterns: A disengaged employee who has quitting on his or her mind will typically be demotivated to come to work and give his or her 100%. Common signs of potential exit cases are taking more leaves, coming in late of leaving early, calling in sick, etc. HR must, therefore, track the leave and attendance management data and also take qualitative inputs from supervisors.
    2. Under performance: A disconnect with the job or the organization often leads to an employee reducing work efforts. Quality of the output may reduce, leading to missed deadlines or shoddy work. It is important to track performance data from this perspective, so that you can catch the warning signs early on, and address the problem.
    3. No interest: Lack of interest is one of the tell-tale signs of disengagement. Employees are often enthusiastic early on but later tend to be more reserved and not participate in activities or organizational events. They may lose interest in talking to colleagues or go out for team events. Such behavioral changes can be easily noticed if one looks out for them. Feedback from peers and seniors is a great way to keep track of such changes.
    4. Voice of the employee: Employees who are resentful may speak publicly about certain negative aspects. Formal feedback sessions and one-on-ones with managers should be properly documented to diagnose a problem. Even informal interactions like water cooler gossip and social media platforms can prove to be a good information source. Look for negative reviews on Glassdoor and for LinkedIn comments to scout for probable exit cases.

    These are just some of the starting data pointers which when organized and processed through proper talent analytics tools can give useful stories of attrition. Analytics tools can be used to derive talent models that arrive at cause-effect relations, related to attrition. For this, HR must invest in the right tools and believe in the power of data. After all, data does not speak fuzzy stuff, but hardcore numbers that talk the real story. And these insights can be corroborated with qualitative inputs from humans to get to know the genuine employee engagement challenges.

    https://www.hrtechnologist.com/articles/employee-engagement/driving-retention-using-talent-data-and-analytics/

4. The dos and don’ts of social media, how not to lose your job

CAPE TOWN – Social media posts might be appealing to most of you and your friends but could also be a step to losing a job.

According to a recruiting platform Jobvite annual Social Recruiting Survey, 93% of hiring managers will review a candidate’s social profile before making a hiring decision and that review matters. A whopping 55% have reconsidered a candidate based on what they find, with most 61% of those double-takes being negative.

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    Respondents to the survey say “making any kind of references to illegal drugs is the worst thing that a social media user can do. The study found that 83% of recruiters say doing so is a strong turn-off.

    One of the most “obviously thing you should not do is list sexual content, which 70% of recruiters say will count against you. Two-thirds told Jobvite that posts including profanity reflected poorly, over half didn’t like posts on guns, and 44% saw posts about alcohol as concerning.

    According to Mashable.com Ashley Payne, a teacher in Barrow County, Georgia, was asked to resign from her job at Apalachee High School in 2009 because of photographs and status updates she posted to Facebook. Payne’s updates showed her drinking alcohol and one update used an expletive. Payne was on vacation in Europe and some of her photographs included her visits to the Guinness Brewery and a local pub in Dublin.

    Payne’s Facebook page was private, however, she had friended some other teachers in her school. When the principal found out about the photos, she was told to render her resignation or face suspension.

    According to the study, 66% of hiring managers said they would hold poor spelling and grammar against candidates.

    Slightly over 1 in 6 recruiters said that not considering keeping your political affiliation to yourself was another potential negative.

    In March 2009, 22-year old Connor Riley was offered a job at Cisco. Her first instinct to tweet about her new opportunity was pretty common for most people of her generation. Unfortunately, Riley’s tweet mentioned that taking a “fatty paycheck” would come at the expense of “hating the work.” A Cisco employee responded to her tweet, offering to pass her sentiments along to the hiring manager. Riley lost the job before it was even started, reports Mashable.com

    Entrepreneur.com reported that Justine Sacco, once a senior director of communications at media company IAC, which owns Tinder and The Daily Beast, was boarding a flight to South Africa when she tweeted the following:

    “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m white!”

    While she was in the air, her tweet went viral. By the time she landed, she was the number-one worldwide trend on Twitter. She was sacked soon afterwards.

    However, the survey also explains some of the things which can be of a positive impression to potential employers.

    “While you’re revising your LinkedIn profile, polish your halo a little,” explains Jobvite’s survey. “Information about volunteering or donations to charity left 65% of recruiters walking away with a positive impression.”

    The survey also showed that respondents said they try to determine things like professional experience, mutual connections, examples of previous work, and cultural fit.

    The study also lends some insight into how recruiters use different social networks. LinkedIn is clearly the king of the hill at 79% of respondents say they have hired through the network, versus 26% through Facebook and 14% through Twitter.

    Nearly all hiring managers will use LinkedIn for every step of the recruitment process, including searching for candidates, getting in contact, and vetting them pre-interview.

    In contrast, Facebook is primarily used for showcasing the employer’s brand and getting employees to refer their friends. About two-thirds of recruiters also use the network to vet candidates before or after an interview. Twitter appears to be the platform least used by hiring managers and is used similarly to Facebook, but with less of an emphasis on candidate vetting.

    No matter what the platform, however, the takeaway for workers is clear: “Best be vigilant not to post anything you wouldn’t mind an employer or potential employer seeing,” explains Jobvite’s survey.

    “Make sure to check your Facebook privacy settings, but don’t depend on them because they’re known to change frequently.”

    https://www.iol.co.za/business-report/the-dos-and-donts-of-social-media-how-not-to-lose-your-job-10723587

5. How robust is your succession planning system?

Next-generation Human Capital Management can be an ally in finding the right successors

Though succession planning has been receiving considerable attention in recent times, many Indian companies do not have a formal plan of action to replace their higher management. In most parts of the world, a succession plan is considered a crucial part of corporate strategy; however in India, most companies lack a formal process to ensure a smooth transition.

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    When a succession plan is not in place, organisations can face problems that range from absence of an effective strategic direction to reduced financial prudence.

    Use advanced tools

    Succession planning is not just about putting a name behind a title, which in fact is called replacement planning.

    Every key position and key person in an organisation should be part of succession planning. Succession planning doesn’t have to be restricted to just selecting a CEO. The process should include identifying and nurturing key people to build the next generation of leaders.

    Having said that, many companies don’t know how many leaders they have and how many they need. Often, they lack a clear definition of what a leader is. This is because many companies don’t have a formal succession plan in place; or, if they do, it’s old and outdated. Here, technology can help. Companies now have access to the next-generation Human Capital Management (HCM) system that captures the complete workforce data and is supported by powerful analytics and better decision-making. Succession planning will help companies stabilise and streamline their operations while ensuring that their employees remain satisfied. Many organisations are clueless about how to find the right method for successful succession planning.

    This is where HCM solutions can come in handy.

    HCM enables senior leaders, managers, directors, and the HR department to take a strategic approach to recruiting and nurturing the required skilled manpower. It is an effective method for recruiting and retaining top-performing employees.

    The HCM tool ultimately simplifies HR’s role in the search for successors.

    Create a talent pool

    For both small and large enterprises, technology saves time and effort by managing employee data related to employee performance, talent requirements, training needs, learning application and employee feedback, giving HR professionals a more complete view. Succession planning is not just about identifying and making a talent pool available for replacing key roles whenever a vacancy arises. From identifying high-potential talent to selecting and preparing a talent pool for succession, training them, planning their learning and career development to implementing the initiatives and assessing performance, the whole process can be integrated using a single efficient HCM tool.

    This supports seamless execution of the succession plan.

    Curate career paths

    Succession planning has become even more reliable and efficient with the intervention of learning and career development initiatives for the employee.

    Organisations should realise that creating a culture of growth and mobility is the key to engaging and retaining employees. The individualised talent development approach is critical to yield better employee engagement. Successfully promoting someone requires a trained person to take over the position being vacated.

    However, it is important to realise that one size (of learning and development methods) doesn’t fit all.

    Hence, here the HCM platform plays a crucial role which develops employees at a very personalised and individual level which is not possible in traditional, standardised classroom training methods. The technology curates career paths tailored to fit each individual’s needs and capabilities.

    There are instances when companies don’t have any formal policy on whether they should hire internally or look outside for succession. However, preference would always be given to an internal talent who has already performed successfully.

    An integrated HCM solution can analyse the current workforce and this exercise includes studying detailed talent profiles, employee summaries, organisation charts, competencies, and job profiles. Secondly, it can assess employees on key areas of leadership potential, job performance and risk of leaving. Organisations need such integrated processes to promote and support career and talent mobility. And such dynamic talent mobility is vital to succession planning.

    Curate career paths

    Succession planning has become even more reliable and efficient with the intervention of learning and career development initiatives for the employee.

    Organisations should realise that creating a culture of growth and mobility is the key to engaging and retaining employees. The individualised talent development approach is critical to yield better employee engagement. Successfully promoting someone requires a trained person to take over the position being vacated.

    However, it is important to realise that one size (of learning and development methods) doesn’t fit all.

    Hence, here the HCM platform plays a crucial role which develops employees at a very personalised and individual level which is not possible in traditional, standardised classroom training methods. The technology curates career paths tailored to fit each individual’s needs and capabilities.

    There are instances when companies don’t have any formal policy on whether they should hire internally or look outside for succession. However, preference would always be given to an internal talent who has already performed successfully.

    An integrated HCM solution can analyse the current workforce and this exercise includes studying detailed talent profiles, employee summaries, organisation charts, competencies, and job profiles. Secondly, it can assess employees on key areas of leadership potential, job performance and risk of leaving. Organisations need such integrated processes to promote and support career and talent mobility. And such dynamic talent mobility is vital to succession planning.

    http://www.thehindu.com/education/careers/how-robust-is-your-succession-planning-system/article19474927.ece

Do you like the articles? We update these trends everyday. Come back tomorrow for more interesting articles. Feel free to share them with your co-workers or friends.

(The articles above have been curated from various sources but not been edited by ICube staff)

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